Category Archives: Change

Daily Practicum for the Unemployed: Life Reimagined

This is a great program provided by Life Reimagined through AARP. I strongly encourage you to consider joining AARP to access this and many other programs that can help provide direction in your life, especially if you’ve been unemployed for a long time.  If you need financial assistance, contact the AARP Foundation first.

Life Reimagined helps us make better decisions about relationships, work, purpose, and our general well-being.  You could join them directly for a fee, but your best bet is to join the AARP first to gain access to other programs and discounts.  Either way, the program takes you through a decision-making and exercise process, one step at a time. 

I recently started the program, Get an Edge in Your Job Search, and it provided access to an abbreviated version of the Strong Interest Inventory.  This tool enables a person to compare their interests (strong interests) to others who have high job satisfaction in their field.  For example, if I am someone who likes research, analyzing, and calculating, I may be a good candidate for a job in science.  If I really prefer writing, design, and helping others, I’d probably be a good candidate for a job in communications.  There are additional tools as well, so I’ll be going back to complete them soon.

Combined with new techniques in neuroscience, these are powerful tools, so please give Life Reimagined through AARP a try.

Life Reimagined Institute

Photo courtesy of Modern Farmer, Picturing Women Farmers by Audra Mulkern

Daily Practicum for the Unemployed: Acknowledging Grief

bench under treeI think it fair to say that we get angry and sometimes depressed if we are unemployed.  Maybe we get angry and not depressed, but we do experience a variety of emotions for obvious reasons.  For myself, I noticed I was angry and did nothing; I denied my anger and as a result, I was easily agitated.  This did nothing to help me focus on job hunting; and though I realized I wasn’t getting anywhere with this frame of mind, I couldn’t just stop being angry.  And then it came to me – I was grieving!  I was grieving the loss of my job.

According to Kubler-Ross (in her later years) and others in her field, we can experience grief in response to any great loss and uncertain situations, and that grief is a very personal process.  I believe unemployment, especially long-term unemployment fits the situation.  And I think the key to moving forward is to acknowledge and permit oneself to grieve.    

Once I allowed myself time to grieve, I wanted to take the next step – outside my grief; just one step.  For me, the next step was to share my experiences and read about others in similar situations.  Following that, I started this blog.   With every step I took, I felt more confident in myself and my abilities to take the next step, to define my future.  What is your next step? 

If you are stuck, consider career counseling or psychological counseling even.  Sometimes, we need a new perspective to be able to see the path ahead.   

Have a great day, and please feel free to share!

http://www.ekrfoundation.org/five-stages-of-grief/

http://www.refugeingrief.com/

http://www.ncda.org/

http://www.nbcc.org/counselorfind

https://therapists.psychologytoday.com/rms/

http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/index.aspx

http://psychcentral.com/lib/the-5-stages-of-loss-and-grief/

10 Steps to Change Your Life: A Step-By-Step Guide

This is an oldie but goodie.  Nina Zipkin wrote this articlein September 2014.  She is an Entrepreneur staff reporter, and she compiled a great list of steps that are useful for anybody to get motivated about changing their life.  As you know, I’m all about making changes one at a time, otherwise we can become easily overwhelmed.  Check out her list of steps, pick one a day or one a week or one a month, whatever it takes, to realize positive change in your life.

I understand fully change is not easy.  I like change, a lot, but I also find myself balking at change that takes me too far from my comfort zone; everyone has their limits.  Discovering and accepting my comfort zone is an important part of change for me.  I found if I negotiate and reward myself for small changes, it smooths the path and makes it easier to accept.  If I make a change and stick with it for at least a month, I reward myself with a great book or outing with a friend.

10 Steps to Change Your Life:  A Step-By-Step Guide

How do you reward yourself for positive change?